Every day, every moment, is an opportunity to learn

Making Your Own Indoor Garden (aka Growbox)

Since building my first raised garden bed a couple years ago (there’s a second one next to it now), I’ve really enjoyed growing our own veggies. It’s a fun project if you’re into that sorta thing – fairly easy to setup, cathartic in its rhythm (weed, water, harvest, repeat…), and the payoff half-way through summer is a lot of fresh snacks! It can be a good activity for...

Cooking with Simon Monk – Raspberry Pi Cookbook

It’s been too long since I messed with the Raspberry Pi. It started with Hacktoberfest a few months ago, then we had a baby, and then I got it in my head to write a Chrome extension and… life happened. So I picked up a copy of Raspberry Pi Cookbook by Simon Monk to jump-start things again. I assumed it’d have “recipes” for some cool projects,...

What is a Git alias, and how do I use it?

If you’re unfamiliar with Git’s “alias” feature, it provides a way to create shortcuts for other git commands, which can save you a lot of time.

Learn more about how and why you’ll want to start using them too!

Book Review: Getting Things Done, Part 1

I always have this feeling that there’s tons of “stuff” to do – some that needs to get done and a lot I want to get done. There’s stuff I meant to do years ago that I still kind of intend to do, maybe, someday. I’ve tried to tame it over the years, to gain some sort of mastery over it all, but in every case my need-to-do’s, want-to-do’s and might-do-someday’s all end up as “amorphous blobs of undoability” (a phrase from GTD).

With all that in mind, I’ve finally started reading Getting Things Done by David Allen, something else I’ve intended to do for some time but never got around to. I just finished part 1, and jotted down some thoughts and quotes that really resonated with me…

5 Things You Can Do With a Locally Cloned GitHub Wiki

If you’ve been developing software for any length of time you’ve probably used GitHub, whether as free hosting for your own personal project, or searching for a library to use, or collaboration on a team. There’s a feature of every GitHub repo that in my experience doesn’t get a ton of love, and that’s the GitHub wiki. In all fairness, I’m not sure how much...

Creating My First Google Chrome Extension – Part 3

I was looking forward to wrapping this extension up within the first couple days of xmas break (my workplace shuts its doors between Christmas and New Year’s), but then every single one of my kids got sick in turn. It was a crappy week. But now it’s finally done, and I can generate bookmarks from Pinboard tags the way I wanted. All in all, a good learning experience!

Creating My First Google Chrome Extension – Part 2

PART 1 | PART 2 | PART 3 I started writing my first browser extension a couple weeks ago, and though my spare time has been pretty limited I’ve made some (never as much I’d like) progress. I left off last time with (finally!) figuring out how to authenticate to the Pinboard API. As with so many things, once I knew the...

Creating My First Google Chrome Extension – Part 1

PART 1 | PART 2 | PART 3 Something’s been nagging me… I’ve been on this kick recently, trying to untangle myself from my reliance on all things Google. Their services are great, and I don’t mean the following to be a rant, but a few things worry me… Should I put all my eggs in one basket? It seems unlikely,...

How to compare two objects (testing for equality) in C#

Hacktoberfest and the promise of free t-shirts had me looking for a project to help with this month. That’s how I stumbled across GeneGenie.Gedcom, a genealogical library written in C# (read more about it here), and found myself reviewing everything I know about class equality. I focused on implementing some logic to make sure changes were correctly detected, and in order to do that I had...

What is Hacktoberfest and How Can You Participate?

There are 10 days left in October. 10 days to earn a t-shirt in the third annual Hacktoberfest, when DigitalOcean and GitHub offer swag to the masses to encourage contributions in open source software. Last year, DigitalOcean said participation jumped from under 1000 to 5700+ in nearly a hundred countries. I wonder what the results will be this year? And...